HIV/AIDS Statistics

“HIV Remains A Serious Health Problem.”  CDC

And infections are increasing.

Rate of Increase in Homosexual and Bisexual Males:  12% between 2008 and 2010 (CDC), and 22% among young (aged 13-24) gay and bisexual men.

  • Men?  We do not consider teenagers to be men.  We will use “males.”

In 2014, only one-third of homosexual and bisexual males surveyed by Kaiser was aware that HIV infections are on the rise among gay and bisexual males.  Source.

HIV on the rise

In 2012 in the U.S. about 1.2 million people – in all groups* –  were living with HIV (the most recent year reported).

* All Groups includes heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual males and females, all ages and all races.

Annually, new infections average 50,000 in all groups in the U.S.

Centers For Disease Control: Gay and Bisexual Men.

AIDS.  In 2013, gay and bisexual males accounted for 55% of persons newly diagnosed with AIDS in all groups in the United States.

HIV.  In 2013, in the United States:  the total number of HIV infections among all persons that were newly diagnosed was 47,352.

  • Homosexual and bisexual males accounted for 81% (30,689) of all males newly diagnosed with an HIV infection – 37,887 males – aged 13 years and older; and
  • Homosexual and bisexual males accounted for 65% (35,000) of the 47,352 estimated diagnoses of all persons (all groups) newly diagnosed with an HIV infection.
  • From 2007-2010 there was a 12% increase in new infections among homosexual and bisexual males of all ages.
  • There is a troubling and continuing increase in new infections among homosexual and bisexual males ages 13 – 24:    22 % increase in 2007-2010.

Centers for Disease Control:    HIV in the U.S. At A Glace

Figure 1.  2010.  Estimated New HIV Infections in the U.S. for the Most Affected Subpopulations — Average of 50,000 New Infections Annually

msm-graph-800x325

Source: CDC.  Estimated HIV incidence among adults and adolescents in the United States, 2007–2010. HIV Surveillance Supplemental Report 2012;17(4).  *Subpopulations representing 2% or less are not reflected in this chart.  Abbreviations:  MSM, men who have sex with men; IDU, injection drug user.

  • HIV disease remains a significant cause of death for certain populations.

U.S. Deaths from AIDS

  • About 13,712 people in all groups diagnosed with AIDS died in 2012.

PowerPoint Presentation

Centers for Disease Control

Sexual risk behaviors account for most HIV infections in gay and bisexual males. Most gay and bisexual males acquire HIV through anal sex, which is the riskiest type of sex for getting or transmitting HIV.  For sexually active gay and bisexual males, the most effective ways to prevent transmitting or becoming infected with HIV are to be on antiretroviral medications (to either treat or prevent infection) and to correctly use a condom every time for anal or vaginal sex.  Gay males are at increased risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), like syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia, and CDC recommends that all sexually active gay and bisexual males be tested at least annually for these infections and obtain treatment, if necessary.

Having more sex partners compared to other males means gay and bisexual males have more opportunities to have sex with someone who can transmit HIV or another STD. Similarly, among gay males, those who have more partners are more likely to acquire HIV.


What is the CDC Doing with Our Tax Dollars?

Awareness, Testing, and Prevention Campaigns.

Through its Act Against AIDS campaigns, CDC aims to provide MSM with effective and culturally appropriate messages about HIV prevention.

CDC:  The Prevention Challenge

The large percentage of gay and bisexual men living with HIV means that, as a group, gay and bisexual men have an increased chance of being exposed to HIV. Results of HIV testing conducted in 20 cities as part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) indicated that 18% of gay and bisexual men tested in 2011 had HIV and that HIV prevalence increased with increasing age.

Many gay and bisexual men with HIV are unaware they have it. Even though the NHBS study showed that the overall percentage of gay and bisexual men with HIV who knew of their HIV infection increased from 56% in 2008 to 66% in 2011, there were still many who did not know they had HIV.

Sexual risk behaviors account for most HIV infections in gay and bisexual men. Most gay and bisexual men acquire HIV through anal sex, which is the riskiest type of sex for getting or transmitting HIV. For sexually active gay and bisexual men, the most effective ways to prevent transmitting or becoming infected with HIV are to be on antiretroviral medications (to either treat or prevent infection) and to correctly use a condom every time for anal or vaginal sex. Gay men are at increased risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), like syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia, and CDC recommends that all sexually active gay and bisexual men be tested at least annually for these infections and obtain treatment, if necessary.

Having more sex partners compared to other men means gay and bisexual men have more opportunities to have sex with someone who can transmit HIV or another STD. Similarly, among gay men, those who have more partners are more likely to acquire HIV.

Homophobia, stigma, and discrimination may place gay men at risk for multiple physical and mental health problems and affect whether they seek and are able to obtain high-quality health services.

  • This is not a scientific fact.  Blaming others for not seeking health care for a deadly infectious disease is disingenuous.
  • The blame is directed at religion and health care workers.
  • Stigma occurs mostly in countries other than the U.S.  It’s hardly worth the trouble of spending tax dollars on an unscientific head trip.

In 2015, the CDC released a new 2014 Annual Report from the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention (DHAP).

The Division is focused on advancing powerful biomedical prevention options, including PrEP, while continually refining strategies to help people reduce behaviors that place them at risk.

Today we know more about HIV infection and how to prevent infection than ever before – but significant challenges remain. One of these challenges is that too few people with HIV are aware of their infection and many people with HIV do not receive ongoing treatment.

Just 30% of people with HIV are successfully keeping their virus under control* through treatment; 70% are not.

  • PrEP and PEP – anti-retroviral medicines.

 


Behavior Change Supported by Scientists – but not the CDC

See our Behavior Change page and Ten Myths from The Lancet.


 


 

STD Facts

  1. The reason to get sexuality education out of our public schools:  they promote early sexual activities.
  2. As soon as he took office in 2008, President Obama scrubbed the federal abstinence program that encourages waiting for sex and parental involvement.

Reported Cases of Sexually Transmitted Diseases on the Rise, Some at Alarming Rate

November 17, 2015 CDC Press Release Excerpts

Reported cases of three nationally notifiable STDs – chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis – have increased for the first time since 2006, according to data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the 2014 STD Surveillance Report.

Research needed to better understand increases among gay and bisexual men

Syphilis among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been increasing since at least 2000.

Gay and bisexual men face a higher prevalence of infection within sexual networks which increases the likelihood of acquiring an STD with each sexual encounter.

Laughable if it weren’t so outrageous — Additionally, barriers to receiving STD services such as lack of access to quality health care, homophobia, or stigma may all contribute to greater risk for this population.


  • CDC’s Page last updated: August 12, 2015.
  • The years given by the CDC are the most recent available for the content of this page.

 

 

This page updated on 11/30/2015.

 

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